Archive for the ‘Smoking’ Category

Finally Decent Weather

January 30, 2007

     Finally had some days off that were rain free.  Set the alarm for 4:30 AM.  I fired up the pit by 4:45 and started prepping meat.  I mixed the injection for the pork shoulder and started unwrapping meat.

     I injected the shoulder with Chris Lilly’s injection recipe.  Then I rubbed it down with Bad Byron’s Butt Rub.  Then I rubbed down a 12 pound brisket with brisket rub from Dave Klose.  Brisket and butt were on the grates by 5:15 and I went back to bed.  I kept the pit temp about 225* and threw some Meyer’s regular and Opa’s jalapeno cheese sausages on for lunch.  I also made about 2 dozen armadillo eggs.  Half of the eggs were stuffed with a jalapeno slice and a cube of cheddar cheese.  The other half only had the cheese.  They were all dusted with Hen & Hog Dust.  And I threw on a maple fatty to round it out.

     Armadillo eggs took about 60-90 minutes.  The sausages took about 2 hours.  Pork butt was on for about 14 hours and the brisket about 18 hours.

Here’s the finished products minus the pulled pork: 

Opa’s on the top left, Meyer’s on the top right.  Fatty on the bottom left and armadillo eggs.

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Here’s the brisket flat being sliced.  The point was chopped.

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Smoked Tex-Mex Meatloaf

January 7, 2007

    Meatloaf is a wonderful alternative dish to prepare in the smoker.  I was short on time, so I picked up a prepared uncooked 1.5lb meatloaf at Central Market.  I picked up their Tex-Mex version.  It has a few Mexican spices add in.  It comes in the small foil loaf pan.  I peeled the pan away from the meat about 1 inch all the way around for good smoke penetration. 

     I fired up the smoker to about 275*.  I placed the meatloaf on the hotter end of the pit.  After about an hour, I removed the pan and placed the meatloaf on the cooking grate.  It cooked for about another 1.5 hours  I removed it when the internal temp hit 165*, and let rest about 15 minutes.

      It came out really great.  It wasn’t spicy, but a lot more flavor than some regular meatloaves.  It went well with some yellow corn and mashed potatoes.  I served some spicy BBQ sauce on the side for a little extra kick.

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Italian Fatty Sub

December 27, 2006

     I was rummageing through the freezer and came across a vacu-sealed smoked Italian fatty.  I thawed it out and headed to the pizza shop down the street one last time.  Since I was moving, I knew it was probably my last chance to make a new creation.  I decided on my version of an Italian sub.  I chopped the fatty and we loaded up some fresh foot-long french bread with about half of the meat.  I gave the other half to the pizza man.  We added a little oregano and some Italian seasoning.  Then a ladle or so of marinara sauce the length of the sub.  A few handfuls of mozzarella cheese topped the other fillings.  It was then placed in the brick pizza oven to heat.   

     I tell you, it was one of the top 5 sandwiches I’ve ever had.  Me and the wife made short order of our prospective halves.  This is definitely something that will be reproduced.  I’ll miss you pizza man! 

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The infamous Fatty

December 13, 2006

     Fatties are becoming popular across the country.  They’re easy and versatile.  A fatty is simply a 1 pound pack(chub) of breakfast sausage.  The brands available here in North Texas are mainly Jimmy Dean and Owens.  The offered flavors are Mild, Regular, Hot, Maple and Italian.  Simply choose a couple of different flavors and begin.  Heat your smoker to 225-250 degrees.  Use a sharp knife and carefully cut the sausage wrapper off.  Try to keep the original shape of the sausage.  Simply place on the grates and smoke for 2-3 hours until internal temps reach 165 degrees.  Slice and eat.  They go great on biscuits.  We only slice as needed.  Makes easy breakfast during the week.  Just slice a couple of pieces and they in the pan when your eggs are done.  Or throw them in the microwave and eat between toast.  They offer many options.

      There are endless options when it comes to fatties.  You can try different BBQ rubs and other seasonings on them also.  Or you can stuff them with cheese and jalapenos and make Armadillo eggs.  Same as plain ones, you can stuff them with just about anything.  Use your imagination.  Let me know what you try.

Italian fatty pizza

December 13, 2006

     In a previous post I mentioned smoking a fatty.  In particular, it was an Italian fatty.  I sliced about half a fatty, and headed out the door.  There is a small pizza shop down the road from me.  It is exceptionally good for my area in Texas.  I frequent the place very often.  I took the fatty slices to the pizza guy behind the counter and requested a pizza.  I asked him to use the fatty and add onion also.  Since they know me by name, and know that I cook often, he said sure.  I took enough to share also.  As part of the bribe, I took a six pack of beer to share also.  They were more than happy at the gesture.  After about 20 minutes, I was eating on a great Italian fatty sausage and onion pizza.

Here is the sliced fatty:

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Here’s the great pizza:

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Chris Lilly’s Pork Shoulder

November 10, 2006

     Today I’m smoking 2 pork shoulders.  I’m using Chris Lilly’s Grand Championship Pork Shoulder Recipe from the book Peace Love & Barbecue.  His recipe calls for an injection and dry rub.  The injection was injected last night.  This morning I applied the rub at 5:00 AM and placed in the smoker at 6:30 AM.   Pork butts(shoulders) cook for about an hour to an hour and a half per pound.  For pulled pork, the internal temp needs to reach 195*. 

Here are the butts injected and rubbed. 

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 Stay tuned for finished pics to come.

     Here are the Italian sausage fatties(breakfast logs).  These will be chopped and added to pizza and other Italian dishes. 

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     Below is lunch for the cook.  I threw on 2 fresh bratwurst and 2 fresh Jollypeno sausages from a local butche.  Sausages like these can be done in 1.5-2 hours.  The cook needs something to eat while working on the main course.

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 The pork butts have been in the smoker for 7 hrs.  They should be done in about 4 more hours.

13 hours in the smoker, and the butt is finished.  Here are the final pics of the day.

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November 4th Cook

November 4, 2006

     Today I’m trying a different technique on a pork butt (shoulder).  Ed over at www.kickassbbq.com  has been smoking butts for 5 hours instead of 12-18.  It takes running the smoker at 350*.  I usually run mine at 225-250*.  Here is the finished product.

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Worked out well for a “quick” smoking session.  Good smoke, good color and good taste. 

     I also smoked a couple of fatties.  A fatty is a chub of ground pork sausage that has been smoked.  I smoked maple and sage fatties today.

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     Also on the grates were some ABTs(Atomic Buffalo Turds).  These are cored jalapenos stuffed and wrapped with bacon.  These ABTs are stuffed with a mixture of Velveeta and muenster cheeses and chopped pepperoni, then sprinkled with a sweet and spicey rub.

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